Sunday, July 25, 2010

A Cinema Gallery: 200 Images, Part 5

We're nearing the end of my six-part series on great film images, and I've had a terrific time doing it! Anyway, with 29 more black-and-white images, and one in color, this makes 170. Have fun.


Scratching for life in the sewers. Kanal. (Andrej Wadja, 57; PHOTOG: Jerzy Lipman)



Hangmen Also Die! (Fritz Lang, 43; PHOTOG: James Wong Howe)



The crone in charge, reflected in the mirrors of The Old Dark House. (James Whale, 32; PHOTOG: Arthur Edeson)



A neighboring foot performs a party favor for the armless woman in Freaks. (Tod Browning, 32; PHOTOG: Merritt B. Gerstad)



A getaway at the outset of The Crimson Kimono. (Samuel Fuller, 59; PHOTOG: Sam Leavitt)



The culmination of a masterful shot overlooking a massive funeral procession in I Am Cuba. (Mikhail Kalatozov, 64; PHOTOG: Sergei Urusevsky)



The jig is almost up in Bunny Lake is Missing. (Otto Preminger, 65; PHOTOG: Denys Coop)



Lifeless legs in Kiss Me, Deadly. (Robert Aldrich, 55; PHOTOG: Ernest Laszlo)



Three little girls, playing to the tolling of bells in Tales From The Gimli Hospital. (Guy Maddin, 88; PHOTOG: Guy Maddin)



Nightmare. Begotten. (E. Elias Merhige, 90; PHOTOG: E. Elias Merhige)



The professor makes an important note in Ball of Fire. (Howard Hawks; PHOTOG: Gregg Toland)



“Please, Miss Vale. I know we’re to blame. But please don’t take Daddy away from us.“ Barbara Stanwyck in There’s Always Tomorrow. (Douglas Sirk, 56; PHOTOG: Russell Metty)



Vivian Leigh and Lawrence Olivier, lovers in life and in That Hamilton Woman. (Alexander Korda, 41; PHOTOG: Rudolph Mate)



She looks suspiciously at her subjects. Greta Garbo in Queen Christina. (Rouben Mamoulian, 33; PHOTOG: William H. Daniels)



In her crib. Carroll Baker in Baby Doll. (Elia Kazan, 56; PHOTOG: Boris Kaufman)



Laurel and Hardy commence to prancin’ in Way Out West. (James W. Horne, 37; PHOTOG: Art Lloyd, Walter Lundin)



A secret withheld in Faces. (John Cassavetes, 68; PHOTOG: Al Ruban, Maurice McEndree, Haskell Wexler)



The Ro-Man, amongst the horror of bubbles, in Robot Monster. (Phil Tucker, 53; PHOTOG: Jack Greenhalgh)



Someone finally understands her in David and Lisa. (Frank Perry, 62; PHOTOG: Leonard Hirschfield)



The zoom lens used to great effect in Judgment at Nuremberg. (Stanley Kramer, 61; PHOTOG: Ernest Gold)



A look of pure sex from Irene Dunne in The Awful Truth. (Leo McCarey, 37; PHOTOG: Joseph Walker)



Pas de deax. (Norman McClaren, 68; PHOTOG: Jacques Fogel)



A disorienting high-dive from Olympia. (Leni Riefenstahl, 38; PHOTOG: 47 uncredited cinematographers)



“And it ain’t a fit night out for man nor beast.” W.C. Fields in That Fatal Glass of Beer. (Clyde Bruckman, 33; PHOTOG: no credit)



Bette Davis at her meanest in The Little Foxes. (William Wyler, 41; PHOTOG: Gregg Toland)



De Lawd (Rex Ingram) gathers with his angels in The Green Pastures. (Marc Connelly and William Keighly, 36; PHOTOG: Hal Mohr)



Guilt overwhelms in Germany Year Zero. (Roberto Rossellini, 49; PHOTOG: Robert Juilliard)



Doing his ape act for Karl Marx in Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment. (Karel Reitz, 66; PHOTOG: Larry Pizer)



A flashlight beam spots a subject in I Walked With A Zombie. (Jacques Tourneur, 43; PHOTOG: J. Roy Hunt)




GMRX--the original ratings system outlined in an Motion Picture Association of America trailer. (1969)



If you wanna make any comments, click on the comments rundown in red. And if you want to see what's been noted so far:

Part One of this six-part series is right here,
Part Two is here,
Part Three is here.
And Part Four is here.


Next time: the final 30 images!

Friday, July 23, 2010

A Cinema Gallery: 200 Images, Part 4

36 color additions to my gallery of 200 screen images! This far in, I strangely feel myself getting way more personal in my choices. There might be what're considered SPOILERS here. By the way, I'll tag five more film bloggers--as is my requirement--at the end of Part 6 in a few days. Arriving at 140 images this time, here we have:


At the movies, a man seems to thank God for his true love in Breaking the Waves. (Lars Von Trier, 96; PHOTOG: Robby Muller)



Only one car remains at L.A.'s Receda Drive-In following the dire day in Targets. (Peter Bogdanovich, 68; PHOTOG: Laszlo Kovacs)



The director, as a child, acknowledges his debt to both stage and screen in the first shot of Fanny and Alexander. (Ingmar Bergman, 83; PHOTOG: Sven Nykvist)



The triptych climaxes. Napoleon. (Abel Gance, 27; PHOTOG: Leonce-Henri Burel, Nikolai Toporkoff, Jules Kruger, Jean-Paul Mundviller)



Jessica Harper can see right through you in her character’s stunning audition for the Phantom of the Paradise. (Brian De Palma, 74; PHOTOG: Larry Pizer)



Jett Rink surveys his new spread in Giant. (George Stevens, 56; PHOTOG: William C. Mellor)



Cheryl Barnes delivers one of the screen’s great one-scene performances, singing “Easy to Be Hard” in Hair. (Milos Forman, 79; PHOTOG: Miroslav Ondricek)



“Will you play me?“ Napoleon Dynamite. (Jared Hess, 2004; PHOTOG: Munn Powell)


Passing a cemetery, Harold can hardly wait to die as Cat Stevens' "Trouble" acts as score in Harold and Maude. (Hal Ashby, 71; PHOTOG: John A. Alonzo)



The new France shows only a reflection of the old in Playtime. (Jacques Tati, 67; PHOTOG: Jean Badal, Andreas Winding)



A brave, generous soul gets it. Z. (Costa-Gavras, 69; PHOTOG: Raoul Coutard)



A romantic picnic at Lake Berryessa has now gone awry. Zodiac. (David Fincher, 2007; PHOTOG: Harris Savides)



One form of misguided, mistreated evil comes slowly into focus in Elephant. (Gus Van Sant, 2003; PHOTOG: Harris Savides)



The final train, coming ‘round the nighttime bend in The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford. (Andrew Dominick, 2007; PHOTOG: Roger Deakins)



Things are about to change in Cache. (Michael Haneke, 2005; PHOTOG: Christian Berger)



The princess from the newfound land joyfully cartwheels in The New World. (Terrence Malick, 2005; PHOTOG: Emmanuel Lubezki)



Eleanor does her final stunt in Gone in 60 Seconds. (H.B. Halicki, 74; PHOTOG: Scott Lloyd-Davies, Jack Vacek)



Shared dream. 3 Women. (Robert Altman, 77; PHOTOG: Charles Rosher Jr.)



A family jaunts about the dead in Oh! What A Lovely War! (Richard Attenborough, 69; PHOTOG: Gerry Turpin)



Only a flesh wound. Monty Python and the Holy Grail. (Terry Gilliam and Terry Jones, 75; PHOTOG: Terry Bedford)



“How can there be any sin in sincere?“ The town council finally finds common ground in The Music Man. (Morton De Costa, 62; PHOTOG: Robert Burks)



John Glenn’s stupendous orbit of our planet. The Right Stuff. (Philip Kaufman, 83; PHOTOG: Caleb Deschanel)



Peter Ustinov's foolish Nero fiddles as you-know-what burns. Quo Vadis. (Mervyn LeRoy, 51; PHOTOG: William V. Skall, Robert Surtees)



A colorful dirge. The Masque of the Red Death. (Roger Corman, 64; PHOTOG: Nicolas Roeg)



The Tingler. (William Castle, 59; PHOTOG: Wilfred M. Cline)



The Fab Four play to Ed Sullivan’s hysterical audience, and to a historical TV viewership, in I Wanna Hold Your Hand. (Robert Zemeckis, 78; PHOTOG: Donald M. Morgan)



No peace. War and Peace. (Sergei Bondarchuk, 68; PHOTOG: Anatoli Petrisky, Aleksandr Shelenkov, Iolanda Chen)



A doomed victim sinks in Fellini Satyricon. (Federico Fellini, 69; PHOTOG: Giuseppe Rotunno)



The rules on how to live a moral life come down in The Ten Commandments. (Cecil B. DeMille, 56; PHOTOG: Loyal Griggs)



Make your choice. The Matrix. (Andy and Larry (Lara) Wachowski, 99; PHOTOG: Bill Pope)



Bright flowers on acid in Easy Rider. (Dennis Hopper, 69; PHOTOG: Laszlo Kovacs)



“Is it okay if I call you mine?“ Fame. (Alan Parker, 80; PHOTOG: Michael Seresin)


Roped for stealing salt in The Man from Laramie. (Anthony Mann; 55; PHOTOG: Charles Lang)



The Roxanne Tango in Moulin Rouge! (Baz Luhrmann, 2001; PHOTOG: Donald McAlpine)



Our last moment together for a while. Wendy and Lucy. (Kelly Reichardt, 2008; PHOTOG: Sam Levy)



“Captain, I don’t know how you feel about this shrimp, but if you’ll eat it, you’ll never have to prove your courage in any other way.“ Apocalypse Now. (Francis Ford Coppola, 79; PHOTOG: Vittorio Storaro)


If you wanna make any comments, click on the comments rundown in red. And if you want to see what's been noted so far:

Part One of this six-part series is right here,
Part Two is here,
and Part Three is here.


Next time: 30 more black-and-white images!